Change Your Smile Change Your Life!

Schedule
Appointment

Featured Services

Decay Arresting Treatment

Decay-Arresting-Treatment

Non-Invasive treatment of small to moderate decay with Silver Diamine Fluoride application have children celebrating!

Prime Dental is very excited to announce that we are using Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) to arrest decay and help with tooth sensitivity! A lot of our patients are already benefitting from the use of SDF, especially younger children.

This revolutionary medication has caught everyone’s attention in recent years!

Silver Diamine Fluoride is an FDA-approved antibiotic liquid clinically applied by a dentist to the decayed tooth area to control active dental decay and prevent further development of disease. When SDF is used as a treatment option for decay arrest, the use of dental drill, shots and placement of fillings are delayed or altogether eliminated, especially on baby teeth!

Although the best way to treat teeth with decay is by removing the decay and placing a filling, this alternative non-invasive treatment allows us to stop decay or to slow its progression, particularly with young children that have baby teeth and who cannot stay in the dental chair for extended time or who have dental anxiety.

SDF not only helps to arrest decay development in affected teeth bat also has been shown to lower cavity risk of the adjacent tooth surface. While this medication is being used widely for pediatric dental patients, adult patients and their teeth can greatly benefit from its use as well.

The New York Times recently published an article that discussed the use of silver diamine fluoride as a minimally invasive treatment option for dental caries in children. The article discussed many benefits of silver diamine fluoride, including treating carious teeth without a drill at a lower cost to patients, fewer pediatric hospital visits due to dental emergencies, and improved oral health for nursing home residents.

To insure the best outcome, silver diamine fluoride has to be reapplied approximately every 6 months to the affected areas where tooth decay was present.  Research supports multiple treatments, and caries arrest shouldn’t be expected with a single treatment. The standard regimen is two applications at weekly interval.

When applied to the decayed teeth, Silver diamine fluoride will only stain defects in the tooth structure, such as decayed lesions and filling margins; sound tooth structure will not be stained by silver diamine fluoride.

When is treatment with Silver Diamine Fluoride recommended?

There are several circumstances in which it may be recommend. Those include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Children who may have excessive decay (severe early childhood caries) and who cannot stay in dental chair for the decay to be removed with the drill.
  • Young children who have difficulty cooperating for treatment
  • Special needs patients
  • Children with carious lesions that may not all be treated in one visit
  • Adults who do not want to have restorations/fillings done due to financial reasons

What are the benefits of SDF?

Silver Diamine Fluoride is an effective and non-invasive fluoride treatment for kids and adults whose cavities cannot otherwise be treated at one time. It is also recommend for children with disabilities or those who are unable to sit for longer cavity treatments. Benefits of the SDF use include:

  • Non-invasive
  • Quick treatment time
  • Painless
  • Effective cavity prevention
  • Slows down or stops tooth decay
  • Relieves tooth sensitivity in deep decay lesions.

Are there cons associated with Silver Diamine Fluoride?

There are some cons associated with the use of SDF, which include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Any decayed areas of the teeth will stain black. Healthy tooth structure will not stain. Stained tooth structures can be later replaced with a filling or crown when patient is ready for more advanced procedures. SDF may discolor dental fillings and crowns.
  • If Silver Diamine Flouride is applied to skin or gums, a temporary brown or white stain may appear on the area. The stain cannot be washed off and resembles henna tattoo, but it is harmless and will disappear within a few days to three weeks.
  • SDF has a bitter taste if it is splashed on the tongue. The patient may notice a metallic taste after an application. This will go away quickly.
  • While every reasonable effort is made by the dentist to ensure the success of the treatment of decay with SDF application, there is a risk that the procedure will not stop the decay if it progressed into the deeper tooth structure, and no guarantee of success is granted or implied.

If the tooth decay is not arrested, the decay will progress. In that case the tooth will require further dental treatment such as further Silver Diamine Fluoride application, dental fillings, root canal therapy, or extraction.

These side effects may not include all of the possible situations reported by the manufacturer. If you notice other effects, please contact your dentist.

You should not be treated with Silver Diamine Fluoride if:

  • You are allergic to silver
  • There are painful sores or raw areas on your gums (i.e. ulcerative gingivitis) or anywhere in your mouth (i.e. stomatitis)
  • If patient already have an infection due to extensive decay spread in the tooth, and experiences pain or swelling.

To learn more about SDF and how we can help you and your children, please call and schedule an appointment with Prime Dental 724 547 0690. We look forward to meeting you soon!

References:

UCSF Protocol for Caries Arrest Using Silver Diamine Fluoride: Rationale, Indications, and Consent. Jeremy A Horst,1,2 Hellene Ellenikiotis,1 UCSF Silver Caries Arrest Committee, and Peter M Milgrom https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4778976/

Dental Videos Regarding Procedures

Dental Procedures

In case, in addition to the information we provided on our website, you would like to watch a video about dental procedures you are interested in, please go to this website LINK and click on the video you are interested in.

Invisalign

Invisalign

Invisalign is an orthodontic appliance system used to inconspicuously treat crooked and crowded teeth in adults and teens. This modern take on braces features a system of clear aligner trays that are worn at all times with the exception of during meals and when brushing or flossing. The trays are custom fitted to the teeth, making them virtually unnoticeable when laughing, talking, and eating with other people. Patients receive a sequence of trays, each of which is slightly different than the one before. The aligners provide a slight resistance to the teeth, forcing them to move into alignment over time. With Invisalign, adults and teens can achieve the smiles they’ve always wanted without feeling self-conscious about the mode of treatment.

Did you know…

wearing Invisalign is in no way as restrictive as traditional braces? Many adults opt for this system not only because it is discreet, but also because there is no need to change your diet to avoid foods that could damage braces. This is because the Invisalign system is free of braces and brackets, instead opting for a removable tray that can be taken out prior to meals. Also, Invisalign fits well into busy adult schedules, as there is no need to attend frequent visits for wire tightening. Most patients simply change to a new aligner tray every couple of weeks.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I a candidate for Invisalign?

If you have crooked or crowded teeth that are embarrassing to you or otherwise preventing you from achieving optimal oral health, Invisalign could be the solution for you. Visit your Invisalign dentist for a complete consultation to find out if you could benefit from clear orthodontics.

What should I expect during my Invisalign treatment?

You will wear your aligners nearly all of the time, with the exception of about two hours per day. Invisalign treatments are different for everyone, but most patients can achieve their ideal smiles within one to two years. During that time, you can expect to make occasional dental visits to monitor your progress.

Will I need any post-treatment care?

Following your treatment, you will no longer need to wear Invisalign trays. However, you will need to wear a retainer each day to help protect your new smile. It is also important to continue visiting your dentist for routine check-ups and twice-yearly cleaning.

Dental Sealants

Dental Sealants

Dental sealants are clear coatings applied to the surfaces of a child’s molars to prevent the development of tooth decay. They work by preventing food and plaque from resting in the grooves and crevices of molars – an area especially susceptible to cavities. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, nearly 1 in 3 U.S. children ages 6 to 12 currently have sealants on their teeth.

Did you know…

that sealants can last as long as 5 to 10 years pediatric dental patients? Depending on a child’s oral development and risk factors for tooth decay, sealants may be applied to the teeth as young as age 6. It is at this time that the first molars typically appear. Additional molars erupt at approximately age 12. If possible, sealants should be applied to a child’s teeth immediately after any molar has appeared to reduce the risk of early decay.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will dental sealants affect the feel or appearance of my child’s teeth?

Sealants bond directly to the teeth, where they harden to a clear or tooth-colored coat. This makes them virtually undetectable to others. Though it is normal to feel new sealants with the tongue, most children quickly adapt to their presence.

What will my child experience when getting sealants?

The process of getting sealants is fast and painless. The tooth is cleaned before the dentist paints the sealant onto the enamel. The sealant will immediately harden, acting as a barrier between bacteria and the chewing surface of the teeth. In most cases, sealants will last several years before needing to be reapplied. However, regular visits to the dentist will be necessary to monitor the condition of the sealants and examine their effectiveness.

Will sealants prevent all cavities?

While sealants are extremely effective for preventing tooth decay in children, they do not replace other forms of preventative oral health care. Children should still brush and floss each day using a fluoridated toothpaste. Regular dental exams and a balanced diet low in sugar are also essential for good long-term oral health.

Digital X-Rays

Digital X-Rays

Digital x-rays are a more streamlined way of taking dental radiographs. Like traditional x-rays, digital versions provide an in-depth view of the structures of the mouth, helping dentists detect complications and develop effective modes of treatment. Digital x-rays are capable of revealing hidden caries, bone erosion, and even tooth decay hiding beneath restorations.

Requiring less radiation and no film to process, digital x-rays have become the standard for oral imaging. These systems produce instant digital images that can easily be enhanced and enlarged for a more accurate diagnosis. The images are captured, stored, and even transmitted via in-office computers. In fact, dentists can easily print or email copies of x-rays in just seconds.

Dental x-rays make for a better and more efficient patient experience. Office visits are faster, patients are exposed to less radiation, and radiographs can be sent to a specialist for review in a fraction of the time necessary for traditional film x-rays.

Dental Health and Your Diet

Dental Health and Your Diet

Your body works hard to convert the foods you eat into energy. You may not think twice about what you are eating – especially when it comes to grabbing an afternoon snack or sipping on a vanilla latte on your commute. But the food you put in your mouth affects more than just your waistline. The truth is, your diet has a direct effect on your overall dental health. Developing good eating habits can lead to excellent oral health free of decay and gum disease. The American Dental Association recommends avoiding certain foods that can expedite decay, such as foods high in sugar.

Did you know…

that eating a slice of pie in the afternoon could be more dangerous to your oral health than eating the same piece of pie as a dessert after dinner? According to the ADA, snacking between meals – especially on sugar-filled foods – can more rapidly lead to decay than eating the same foods with meals. If you must eat the mid-afternoon pie, reach for the toothbrush afterward. Better yet, swap the pie for a nutritious, sugar-free snack like string cheese or some baby carrots.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I change my eating habits to better my oral health?

Probably. But never start a new diet without first consulting with your physician. If you are on a special diet, be sure to speak with your dentist about the types of foods you should be eating that comply with your diet and can also optimize your oral health.

What types of changes will my dentist recommend?

In addition to avoiding sugary foods, the ADA recommends drinking plenty of water each day and avoiding snacks between meals whenever possible. It is also important to consume nutritious foods from each of the major food groups, including whole grains, vegetables, lean proteins, low-fat dairy, and fruits. Not only will you improve the health of your teeth and gums, but you may drop a pant size too!

Are there any other habits I should be adopting to improve my oral health?

Yes. You should be flossing daily and brushing twice daily using a soft-bristled toothbrush. You should also be visiting your dentist at least twice per year for oral exams and professional dental cleanings.

Bad Breath

Bad Breath

Having bad breath can be an embarrassing problem – especially if you are regularly face to face with other people. Known professionally as halitosis, bad breath plagues many people every day. Most cases of bad breath can be remedied by efficiently brushing the teeth. However, some types of bad breath are chronic or recurring, which may warrant a visit to the dentist.

Bad Breath

Did you know…

that bad breath can be caused by something as simple as eating too much garlic, or that it could be a serious symptom of a disease? Some of the most common causes of bad breath include dry mouth, certain medications, use of tobacco, poor dental hygiene, and oral infections. In rare cases, bad breath may be a sign of diseases like cancer or gastroesophageal reflux.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need treatment for my bad breath?

If your bad breath does not improve despite self-care techniques, such as dietary adjustments and thorough tooth brushing, you may need to see a dentist about pursuing professional treatment. Keep in mind that short-term remedies like gum, breath mints, and mouthwash may temporarily freshen breath, but they are not a solution to the underlying problem.

What should I expect my dentist to do about my bad breath?

Your visit will begin with an examination and questions about your daily habits, such as the types of foods you eat and the medications you take. Your dentist may then inspect your mouth for signs of decay, infections or gum disease that could be causing your bad breath. If your chronic bad breath cannot be traced to an oral problem or daily habit, you may be referred to a physician for further evaluation.

Is there anything I can do to maintain better breath?

Yes. If bad breath is a source of embarrassment for you, try to keep breath fresheners on-hand at all times. Sleep with your mouth closed, as this prevents dry mouth and helps tame morning breath. Eliminate odor-causing foods from your diet, such as garlic and onions, and make an effort to brush your teeth and tongue every morning and night. Finally, be sure to visit your dentist for professional cleanings at least twice per year to remove built-up plaque that can cause chronic halitosis.

How to Brush Your Teeth

How to Brush Your Teeth

Brushing your teeth is probably a standard part of your daily routine, but chances are you aren’t following the American Dental Association’s guidelines for cleaning your teeth properly. The ADA currently recommends that you brush your teeth at minimum of two times each day – preferably morning and night or anytime you eat foods that contain sugar. When you brush, your toothbrush should be tilted at a 45 degree angle to your gum line. As you brush, be sure to remove debris from every surface of the teeth – including the backs of the teeth, near the gum line, and on chewing surfaces. It is also important to brush your tongue, as bacteria can accumulate there and cause malodorous breath.

Did you know…

that the type of toothbrush you use makes a difference in your oral health? The ADA recommends using a soft-bristled toothbrush with a head that is ergonomically proportioned to the inside of your mouth. Many patients erroneously believe that medium or hard-bristle toothbrushes are more efficient; but these brushes can actually cause abrasions to the teeth and gums, making them more vulnerable to decay. The ADA also recommends replacing your toothbrush about four times yearly or whenever the bristles become frayed.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I change my brushing habits?

You may need to change your brushing habits if you are experiencing signs of poor oral hygiene. Examples of common symptoms include bleeding or reddened gums, excessive plaque build-up, decaying teeth and receding gum lines. To find out if you are brushing correctly or if you need to change your brushing habits, make an appointment with your  dentist for a full consultation.

What should I expect if I begin brushing my teeth correct?

The benefits of proper tooth brushing techniques may not be experienced immediately, but they are noticeable long-term. Over time, brushing too hard or not brushing enough can produce oral health complications that cannot be reversed and require special treatment. By adopting proper brushing habits, you could avoid expensive dental bills in the future.

Is there anything else I need to do in addition to brushing properly?

Yes. It is important that you also floss daily and use toothpaste that contains fluoride each day. You should also schedule dental exams and professional cleanings in at least twice per year.

Composite Tooth-Colored Fillings

Composite-Tooth-Colored-Fillings

Composite fillings – also known as tooth-colored fillings – are dental restorations designed to be inconspicuous and natural in appearance. They blend well with the teeth and appear more natural than amalgam fillings, which are darker and more easily seen by other people. Composite fillings are made of ceramic and plastic compounds that chemically bond to the teeth. They can be used to fill in decayed areas of the teeth, as well as to help repair chipped or broken teeth. Most dentists use composite restorations to treat the teeth closest to the front of the mouth, as they are more noticeable when patients smile. However, advancements in dental technology and the composition of composite fillings have made it possible for Auburn dentists to also use tooth-colored fillings on molars, which receive more wear than other teeth.

Did you know…

that composite fillings allow dentists to preserve more of the natural tooth structure? This is because composite materials chemically bond to the surface of the tooth like an adhesive. The process takes slightly longer to complete than traditional amalgam fillings, but patients can preserve more of the natural portion of the teeth while enjoying a restoration that is discreet and understated.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I a candidate for tooth-colored fillings?

If you have a cavity, broken tooth, or a deteriorated filling, you may be a candidate for a tooth-colored filling. Schedule a dental consultation to find out if composites are right for you.

What should I expect if my dentist decides a composite filling is right for me?

During your visit, your gums and teeth will be anesthetized with a local anesthetic near the site of the filling. Once the area is numb, the decayed or damaged portion of your teeth will be removed to make room for the new tooth-colored filling. A resin will be placed over the area and cured with a hand-held light for less than a minute. The new filling will then be shaped and polished before the procedure is complete.

 What type of post-treatment care is required after getting a composite filling?

Composite fillings are cured with light at your dentist’s office. You should be able to return to normal activity and oral care immediately after your visit. It’s normal for treated teeth to experience some sensitivity to hot and cold in the days following treatment, but sensitivity that persists beyond a week should be reported to your dentist.

Electric Brush vs. Manual Brushes

Electric Brush vs. Manual Brushes

Preventative dentistry is about more than just visiting your dentist twice yearly for an exam and thorough cleaning. In fact, the majority of your preventative care is done at-home as a part of your normal hygienic routine. Many residents use manual toothbrushes to remove debris and plaque from their teeth. However, electric brushes have become widely popular in recent years, leaving some to wonder whether one type is better than the other.

Did you know…

the American Dental Association does not lean toward one type of brush over the other? It does, however, acknowledge that people with upper body mobility restrictions may better benefit from an electric toothbrush instead of a manual brush. Regardless of which type you decide is right for you, the ADA recommends that all brushes be soft-bristled so as to avoid abrasions that can lead to decay and receding gum lines.

Frequently Asked Questions

Which toothbrush should I be using?

You can effectively brush your teeth with either a manual toothbrush or an electric one. However, the rapid movements of motorized versions may be more effective at removing plaque from the teeth and gum line. If you have questions about which toothbrush is best for you, speak with your dentist about it at your next visit. He or she may recommend an electric brush with an oscillating head or a brush that includes a timer to let you know how long to brush.

What types of results should I be getting from by toothbrush?

Regardless of whether you choose an electric brush or a manual brush, it should be easy for you to maneuver in your mouth and behind your back teeth. If the head is too big, it may not be effectively removing plaque from your teeth.

My electric toothbrush was expensive. Do I need to change it as often as a manual brush?

Yes. Your toothbrush should be replaced at least once every three to four months or whenever you notice fraying. However, most electric toothbrushes come with interchangeable heads. In other words, you won’t need to replace the entire device – only the brush itself.

10% off Crowns
Cannot be combined with insurances claim
View our promotions

Testimonials

 

Dr. Lucas is a great dentist! Very progressive when it comes to dentistry. Updated on latest dental technology. I go to her myself and take my both kids. Very knowledgeable, gentle and caring. Kids have no fears at all when they need to have their teeth checked any more! Definitely would recommend to anybody.
SHERRY W.

 

 

I only have great things to say about the office and staff. They listened to my issue and were able to suggest the best of procedures to me. I’m glad that I’ve made my appointment.
John Q.

 

 

Dr. Lucas was able to look at my case and educate me on what is recommended. It’s hard to find someone that I can trust, all staff members were able to do so. All while making me feel comfortable during my appointment. Would recommend to my family and friends!
Dan G.

 

 

Heather was very accommodating as I did not have much availability for appointments. They were able to take me in with late notice. I’m happy that there was ample parking!
Jennifer L.

 

Contact Us

Call Us (724) 547-0690

Email us

Get In Touch

We serve these
surrounding areas:

Directions